Truck crashes into jewelry store, jewelry stolen

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — A Memphis businessman is left picking up the pieces after his store was burglarized Friday morning in a smash-and-grab.

Video surveillance captured a truck driving into Cunningham’s Watch and Jewelry Repair in Midtown.

That was the moment store owner Craig Cunningham’s life changed.

“It’s very disappointing especially two weeks before Christmas,” he said.

The business owner said the truck crashed into the front of the store around 3 a.m. and the thieves stole nearly $70,000 in jewelry, leaving behind extensive damage and sparking frustration.

“Low down dirty suckas, sap suckas but they’re going to get theirs in the end. I always believe that, that going to happen. Their going to get theirs in the end karma is a you know what,” Cunningham said.

Cunningham’s Watch and Jewelry Repair, located on N. Cleveland Street in the Crosstown area of Memphis, was established in 1986, and the owner says this has never happened before.

Hours after the smash-and-grab, community members and customers came together to help Cunningham clean up as many are struggling to make sense of this crime.

He said he hopes to have the store cleaned and reopened within two days.

The burglars got a way in a white F150. It’s unclear how many burglars are involved. As for Cunningham this has been a learning experience.

“There’s really nothing I can do other than put some barricades across the front of the building but I doubt I will do that. I’ll just be a little bit more due diligence and lot of pieces are put back in the safe at night, like I should have done,” he said.

This is an ongoing investigation. If you know anything about this crime, contact Crime Stoppers at (901)-528-CASH.

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